How to accurately estimate external projects. Part 1 – Delays caused by communication

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This is a first article from “How to accurately estimate incoming projects” series, aimed to help you see the possible future pitfalls. This includes both outsourcing projects and the ones where different teams around the world are involved.IT industry is dynamic. Companies change APIs, IDEs, upgrade hosting servers software, raise new compatibility issues. Of course improvements are welcome, but there is no way you will have a perfect product once and forever – it needs to be re-iterated. Don’t forget about hundreds of different environments that the system should work on. And people.

1. Client Interaction Time

It’s not a big deal when we are talking about local business (and even in such close distance email response delay time could be significant and expensive), but when you’re dealing with international clients and partners, this becomes a more significant issue.

There are several simple rules that are wise to follow in order to keep up with the deadlines:

  • Don’t underestimate time needed for interaction;
  • Client won’t run and read your email instantly, he has work to do;
  • Response time could vary, but prepare for the worst.

Let’s look at an example: you are building an ecommerce website. The catalogues structure is a bit tricky so you need to clarify where a product recommendation slider leads.

  1. You send the request;
  2. Client reads it in 2 hours;
  3. Gets back to you with some questions in order provide proper answer;
  4. When you answer him – you are already off from work;
  5. You read the final response the next day only.

Of course it’s not what may happen every time, but you need to take such issues into account before they happen. Here is what could cause “lags” on the client side as well:

  • Clarification from a third party (could be a hosting provider, lawyers, content providers, etc);
  • Interaction between departments;
  • Approval of department manager and other bureaucratic procedures.

In addition to that, there’s been quite a few times, when our clients from other countries needed to clarify detailed info with a a third-party with no people on that side speaking English at all.
The main point of this section is to make you understand how heavily client interaction lag can affect the entire project. It’s worth mentioning because these things rather frequently fall out of scope of attention.

How to avoid possible adverse effects? A checklist or a roadmap will be helpful to manage handling tasks in advance. In Codebranch, we prepare a project roadmap with Freeze dates, which are the last dates that a certain part of team-client interaction is due. For instance, there are:

  • Design Freeze Date – this is when the client takes a final approval and signoff to the proposed design, all the amendments and improvements to the design have to go before that date.
  • Functionality Freeze Date – the milestone by which the final application functionality should be agreed upon.
  • Content Delivery Date – this is when the content provided by client is due, so the client would know the timing in advance and have enough time to gather the content.
  • Hosting or CDN accounts purchase dates, domain name registration deadline – when, and no later, the accounts need to be available to the development team in order to set the environment up and deploy on time.

These dates are elaborated together with the client, basing on the delivery timelines that the client suggests, and adjusted accoring to the internal development milestones. This approach helps both the team and the client meet the responsibilities in working on a web project, and contributes into building a good working relationship.

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